Paradise Valley thunderstorm, rainbow, fall colors and the Yellowstone River
Buckskin horse, red barn, paradise valley montana
A Paradise Valley Farm

This gem on the northern border of Yellowstone received It's named “Paradise Valley” for good reason, this premier Montana vacation spot has perfect summers and mild winters with spectacular views of th Absaroka and Gallatin mountain ranges under the famed Montana "big sky." The close proximity to Yellowstone Park; the Beartooth Highway and many other natural wonders make Paradise Valley the perfect place to vacation. Besides having the legendary fly-fishing river “The Yellowstone” flowing through its center, world class spring creeks; private lakes and other fishing streams draw anglers from around the world. World class big game hunting, whitewater rafting, kayaking, wildlife viewing and photography, hiking, camping and horseback riding are just a few of the unlimited recreational opportunities available here in Paradise Valley. Many fine Bed and Breakfasts, cabins and guest ranches provide lots of options for fine lodging.

Fall colors and the Yellowstone River in Paradise Valley Montana
The Yellowstone River is the center piece of Paradise Valley.

Emigrant peak casts a broad shadow over the valley. The scene of such recent movies as “A River Runs Through It” and “The Horse Whisperer”, Paradise Valley has its unique share of both trophy homes and deep rooted ranches and farms. Much like Pikes Peak on the front range of Colorado, Emigrant Peak is often framed in the large living room windows of the homes belonging to those lucky enough to live or visit such a wonderful place. Climbers find a world of wonder in the neighboring peaks in the Northern Absaroka Mountains including Mount Cowen, Black Mountain, the Pyramid, Crow Mountain, Chico Peak, Marten Peak and Mount Wallace.

Paradise Valley is situated in southwestern Montana. It is located just north of Yellowstone National Park in Park County, Montana, which lends its name to the county. Mule deer enjoy the open range and grasslands available to them in Paradise Valley. Paradise Valley extends from the Yellowstone gateway community of Gardiner at the south end, to historic Livingston on the north. Appropriately named, this region is a "paradise" to Montana and to the Rocky Mountains. Providing a unique backdrop of snowcapped peaks, the valley features beautiful ranchlands, flowing rivers, spring creeks and abundant wildlife.

The Bozeman Pass separates Paradise Valley from the Gallatin Valley and Bozeman; MT. Interstate 90 passes through both communities. The valley lies predominantly along a north-south axis, and is anchored to the north by Livingston, Montana, and to the south by Yankee Jim Canyon, approximately fifteen miles north of Gardiner, Montana and the north entrance of Yellowstone Park. US Highway 89 passes through the valley and into Yellowstone National Park. The Paradise Valley was the original entrance to Yellowstone.

Big Ranibow Trout fly-fishermen floating down Yellowstone River in drift boat as they fish for trout
Fish like this one make fly-fishermen return to Paradise Valley's Yellowstone River and famous spring creeksyear after year.
fly-fishermen floating down Yellowstone River in drift boat as they fish for trout

The Yellowstone River is noted for world-class fly-fishing in the river and nearby spring creeks such as DePuy Spring Creek. The valley hosts other natural wonders such as several natural hot springs, including Chico Hot Springs near Emigrant, Montana, La Duke Hot Springs near Gardiner, and Hunter's Hot Springs near Livingston.

whitewater rafters, Yankee Jim Canyon
Whitewater Rafting in Yankee Jim Canyon can be a lot of fun if you don't mind getting wet.

An eclectic blend awaits you as you travel through the shops, museums, galleries, and restaurants. From cowboys to culture, from railroads to whitewater, from the historic to the contemporary…

Paradise Valley is the heart of Montana’s fly-fishing and North American big game world. Our creeks, rivers, and alpine lakes are experiences unto itself and our Outfitters and Guides have a history comparable to the glorious land where they work and give you an experience that will last a lifetime.

Take your choice...you may choose to explore the winding scenic trails of Paradise Valley by horseback, or on foot, to soar with eagles as you rise above the Montana horizon and find the spot where Heaven and Paradise On Earth meet.

 

buckrail Fence, Yellowstone River Mill Creek, fall, paradise valley, montana
Buckrail Fence, Yellowstone River
Mill Creek, fall, paradise valley, montana
Ranch, Paradise Valley, Montana, mill creek Whitetail deer doe, paradise valley montana
Ranch, Mill Creek, Paradise Valley, Montana,
Whitetail deer doe, Paradise Valley montana
mill creek, snowstorm, fall, paradise valley,montana
Bald eagle, perched above yellowstone river
Mill Creek Snowstorm, Paradise Valley, MT
Bald Eagle watchin for fish in the Yellowstone River
Paradise Valley Fall
Buck, doe, herd, whitetail, deer, paradise valley montana
The Yellowstone River, fall
Herd of whitetail deer in Paradise Valley Montana

Yellowstone News

Skiing Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Skiing in the lap of nature in Jackson Hole

Jackson, Wyoming, is a rarity among the world's great ski towns because it is one of the few that is busier in summer than winter. But this is hardly the only thing that sets Jackson apart; it is rare in a lot of other enticing ways. It is a place where every stereotypical image of the American Wild West comes to life, from the arches in the town square made of elk antlers to the bar stools in the famed Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, topped with saddles. You might well see a bison on your short trip from the airport to the town and you will certainly see an elk. But beneath this romantic Butch Cassidy veneer, it is also one of the wealthiest enclaves in the US, where second home owners run the gamut from movie stars (Harrison Ford) to superstar athletes (Tiger Woods) and even former vice-presidents (Dick Cheney).............. rest of story

20 Years On, Yellowstone National Park's Experiment With Wolves Continues To Evolve • by Deby Dixon

"…A country without wolves isn't really good country, it's incomplete - it doesn't have its full spirit," said Yellowstone National Park biologist Doug Smith during an interview last year with NPR's Snap Judgement, about wolves, specifically about the life and death of a famous Yellowstone wolf, 832F, or 06. I set up my cheap scope and pointed it on the high, snow-covered hill where I had last seen the wolves and there stood a black pup, wearing a GPS collar, watching something below. Briefly, its father, also wearing a GPS collar, appeared on the hill before fading away. A van pulled in and visitors rushed out to see if I had found a wolf. "My first wolf in the wild," a woman exclaimed while looking through my scope.............. rest of article


Wolves hunting elk

Wolf eating elk carcass

Weird, wonderful things abound in Yellowstone in winter

When Yellowstone National Park is covered in a blanket of snow, things can get a little weird. With the 2.2-million acre park's geothermal stew of geysers, hot springs, fumaroles and mud pots, dizzying array of wildlife and a vast and diverse landscape, visitors are rewarded with an experience like no place else on Earth. "Throughout the winter season, the park becomes a visual smorgasbord that is both strange and wonderful," said Rick Hoeninghausen, director of sales and marketing for Xanterra Parks & Resorts' Yellowstone National Park Lodges......... rest of article

The park's winter season began Dec. 18 and runs until March 2.

Young 4 Year Old Grizzly Killed By Wyoming Fish And Game......We Want Answers

A young Grizzly bear (#760 - Jim Bear) was killed by wildlife officers that are supposed to protect them from harm. This non aggressive bear was a favorite in the Grand Tetons National Park. He never once showed any signs of aggression and was a good bear. In early October he was "relocated" by Fish and Game because he wandered south of the park and on someone's ranch. By the way, the rancher never complained. Because it was a Grizzly, people freaked out and the bear was taken northwest of Cody, WY near a little town called Clark by Fish and Game. However, this was no place for this bear.....................   read more and sign Petition

grizzly 760 (Jim Bear) six months before he was killed by Wyoming Game and Fish
Jim Bear before Wyoming Game and Fish turned him into a rug.
Grizzly Bear 760

Bear managers' credibility on the line By Tom Mangelson

American poet Robert Frost once expressed a sentiment that many of us feel in our hearts: "The world has room to make a bear feel free."

How I wish it were true today in Wyoming, home to one of the most exceptional bear populations on the planet, including members of the grizzly family so closely identified with our valley.............................  Rest of article

Eighteen below zero, a photographer's delight

By Daryl L. Hunter

Ahh, finally eighteen below zero and beautiful. I have been waiting for a day like this for months. Sadly, too often winter temperatures hover between 20 and 35 degrees, much to warm for the magic of the arctic cold. You draw in that sub-zero air and it's more refreshing than a mouthful of Minto peppermint with a dash of dry ice. Air so crisp it seems it could snap at any moment. The moisture in the air freezes and falls to the ground in sparkly slow motion dance to the ground. This miraculous and dynamic gift from the north facilitates art for those willing to fetch it..........................

rest of story

Yellowstone roadside grizzlies worth rangers' hassle???

Yellowstone visitors would pay an additional $41 to ensure seeing roadside grizzlies, a study shows, and the attraction creates 155 jobs and more than $10 million a year for the regional economy. The $41 visitors would pay is on top of the $25-per-vehicle entrance fee. If Yellowstone no longer allowed grizzly bears to use roadside habitat — and instead chased, moved or killed them — the regional economy would lose more than $10 million a year and 155 jobs according to the paper "The economics of roadside bear viewing."............................Rest of story

New Ebook

The Grand Teton Photo and Field Guide is an encapsulation of the flora, fauna, and photography of Jackson Hole Wyoming and Grand Teton National Park. Also included are thumbnails of the history and geology of the valley. This book is for all visitors with a desire to seek out wildlife, photograph the landscape, or merely learn about the history, geology, and lay of the land of Grand Teton National Park. The author provides general overviews including hot links with more in-depth descriptions of subjects of individual interest.

In the “Lay of the Land” section, includes the obvious highlights along the loop through Grand Teton Park. Hot links to side roads will give you more in-depth description of side roads and feeder roads and their highlights. Also included are descriptions of all two-rut roads that are legal to travel on in Grand Teton Park. GPS links to Google Maps are provided throughout.

As a field guide, profiles of most of animals and birds in the area are described. Jackson Hole is full of wildlife but there are places where animals are, and there are places where they are not. It is a waste of time to scrutinize a landscape devoid of what you are looking for, so this guide narrows options down to the hot spots. I provide maps of the likeliest places to find the popular critters of Grand Teton National Park. I also touch on trees, shrubs, and wildflowers with minimal explanations.  

The grandeur of Grand Teton Park has made it one of the most photographed places in the world. The opportunity to harness multiple juxtapositional elements has drawn photographers for over a century since William Henry Jackson took the first photos here in 1878. Grand Teton Park’s plethora of famous vistas are profiled as well as many which are less clichéd that can bring new perspectives of a well-documented landscape. Grand Tetons’ iconic landscape photo opportunities are described in detail; however, they barely scratch the surface of opportunities as it takes a photographer with an artist’s eye to unveil as they follow their own intuition and vision.  The author who shies away from clichéd landscapes provides a chapter of his favorite places that aren’t landscape clichés.

In the photography section the author includes chapters on composition, exposure basics, when to shoot and why. Daryl has summarized what he teaches in his, half day, Grand Teton workshops in a simple concise way.

If you are only in Grand Teton Park for a day there is a chapter called the “Portfolio Packer Morning Trip,” that does just that, all the icons and several favorite places in a five our blitz.  But it is better to spend more time and dig deep into the embarrassment of riches of Grand Teton National Park................. More Info

Yellowstone National Park: highlights

Locals like to say there's never a bad day in Yellowstone. But some activities are better than others. Near the top of my list is a slow drive along the north shore of Yellowstone Lake. The easy trail to Storm Point is worth a half hour's walk, or more if the wind is calm and the boulders are comfortable for sitting. A few miles east, a side road leads to Lake Butte Overlook which offers views across North America's largest alpine lake to the Teton range 100 miles south. This is a good place to be at sunset........................ rest of story

Yellowstone Volcano Warning?

Yellowstone National Park is fighting viral rumors that the park's bison are fleeing an impending supervolcano eruption. Officials told Reuters that they've been fielding dozens of calls and emails since a video of galloping bison went viral this week in the wake of an earthquake at Yellowstone. They said the video actually shows the animals running down a paved road that leads deeper into the park................. rest of story

Red and Yellow Aspens, Grand Tetons for the Bridger Teton National Forest

 

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