Wyoming's Wind River Valley

Fly-fisherman, Wind River, Dubois Wyoming

The Wind River Valley a is where ancient geology meets today’s adventurer, where an adventurous day of moving cattle from horseback, can be followed by an evening of fine dining and fine art. Wide expanses of country enrich the senses, from sage on the morning air, or the cry of an eagle, to the sight of majestic snow-covered mountain peaks. The vivid landscape is rich with the juxtaposition of a festival of the color, sounds, and sights of breathtaking wonder. The Red Desert’s Badlands stand starkly against the stark contrast of the magnificent Absaroka and Wind River Mountains that serrate the skyline in the background. The deep curve of the Wind River Valley is shaped by the snowcapped Wind River Range to the West and the Absaroka and Owl Creek ranges on the east, forming a cottonwood-lined bottom that many consider one of the most beautiful areas in Wyoming.

Brooks Lake in the Absoraka Mounains

From the highest peak in the state (Gannett Peak, at 13,785 feet), down through a valley laced with1850’s wagon train routes, still showing signs of deeply rutted wagon tracks, and on across the authentic cultural sites of the starkly beautiful Wind River Indian Reservation,

The west is alive and well in the Wind River Valley, a traveler may find a highway briefly blocked with a cattle drive, right through town. When you experience firsthand the vast array of terrain and geological wonders, it’ll become clear why so many activities center on our great outdoors. The Wind River Valley hosts a couple thousand miles of great fishing streams, plenty of trails for riding or hiking, and It is home to two state parks and two national forests for even more recreational opportunities! Vacation highlights that range from rodeos and Powwows to sled dog races, jazz festivals, a mountain man rendezvous and hot air balloon rally! And with pronghorn antelope numbering nearly as high as the human population, you’ll find there’s plenty of elbowroom during any season, to enjoy your vacation. The only thing Wind River Country doesn’t have is the crowds of its famous neighbors, Jackson Hole and Yellowstone.

Ramshorn Peak, Dubois Wyoming

A sizable portion of the valley belongs to the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho Indian tribes of the Wind River Indian Reservation, a place of productive ranches and spectacular wilderness reaching up to the Continental Divide. The Wind River Indian Reservation hosts a couple of casinos and some great, permit only, trout water.

The largest towns of the Wind River Valley are Riverton is a thriving community of 10,000 people located in the heart of Wyoming’s Wind River Country. Lander, which is nestled against the foothills of the Wind River Mountains on the banks of the Popo Agie River where Fremont County history began. Lander saw the first white trappers in 1811 became a small military post in 1869 and now borders the Wind River Indian Reservation. Dubois is an authentic old west town with historic buildings and the mighty Wind River running through. Majestic high mountains surround the area and down town has boardwalks that you can stroll and become acquainted with the variety of stores and wares. Then there are the smaller communities like Shoshone, Fort Washakie, and the historical gold-mining town of Atlantic City.

The beautiful Towgotte Trail, hwy 191 winds its way through the Absoraka Mountains on its way to Jackson Hole and Yellowstone over Towgotte Pass.

The Togwotee Trail, US highway 26-287, west of Dubois is one of the West's most beautiful and diverse regions, abundant wildlife, geographic wonders and a rich history makes it one of the most popular routes to Yellowstone National Park; some stay and never travel any farther.

Backpackers and hikers to the Wind River Mountains can choose from nearly 800 miles of trails in the range's vast, stunning beauty. Over 150 glaciers work the Winds, calling out to hikers and climbers alike. Naturally, the Winds are studded with lakes and creeks, themselves teeming with rainbow, cutthroat, golden, brook, German brown, and Mackinaw trout. Being part of the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem visitors often see the prodigious wildlife this eco-system is host to. One of the world's most magnificent big game animals, the Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, is showcased in the Dubois area, both indoors and outdoors. The Whiskey Mountain Wildlife Habitat Area, just minutes from town, is home to North America's largest wintering herd of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep. And the National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center, in downtown Dubois, provides an awe-inspiring venue for the country's most impressive display of these majestic creatures.

Hunters will find remote wilderness elk like Teddy Roosevelt did when he hunted Wyoming in the late 1800's. The Wind River Valley also has top quality Antelope, Mule Deer, Bighorn Sheep, and Moose hunts.

There is never a shortage of magnificent views and adventures to match in the Wind River country.

 

 

Dunior Valley
Whisky Mountain Sheep, Dubois Wyoming dogsledding Absoraka Mountains, Dubois Wyoming
Bighorn Sheep, Whisky Mountain just south of Dubois Wyoming
Dogsledding up Horse Creek, outside of Dubois WY in the Absoraka Mountain Range
Wind River Autumn
Brooks Lake Creek, and Pinnacle Peak
You can visit a Sue the Bull Elk at the Antler Gallery on the North side of Dubois Wyoming

Yellowstone News

A Case for Collars • By Keith Crowley

As a wildlife photographer I have a real love/hate relationship with radio telemetry collars.  All photographers live in a world of aesthetics, and most wildlife photographers try capture natural animal behavior in natural settings with as little apparent human influence as possible. Even something as ephemeral as a jet's vapor trail in the sky can destroy a wild image. The permanence of collars (and ear tags, too) placed by human hands on wild animals is impossible to ignore.......................For my part, I think are few truly valid reasons not to collar wolves in Yellowstone. But there is also one really good one, and in the interest of open discussion, some points are worth exploring:..............rest of story

grey wolf, yellowstone, Keith Crowley
Skiing Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Skiing in the lap of nature in Jackson Hole

Jackson, Wyoming, is a rarity among the world's great ski towns because it is one of the few that is busier in summer than winter. But this is hardly the only thing that sets Jackson apart; it is rare in a lot of other enticing ways. It is a place where every stereotypical image of the American Wild West comes to life, from the arches in the town square made of elk antlers to the bar stools in the famed Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, topped with saddles. You might well see a bison on your short trip from the airport to the town and you will certainly see an elk. But beneath this romantic Butch Cassidy veneer, it is also one of the wealthiest enclaves in the US, where second home owners run the gamut from movie stars (Harrison Ford) to superstar athletes (Tiger Woods) and even former vice-presidents (Dick Cheney).............. rest of story

20 Years On, Yellowstone National Park's Experiment With Wolves Continues To Evolve • by Deby Dixon

"…A country without wolves isn't really good country, it's incomplete - it doesn't have its full spirit," said Yellowstone National Park biologist Doug Smith during an interview last year with NPR's Snap Judgement, about wolves, specifically about the life and death of a famous Yellowstone wolf, 832F, or 06. I set up my cheap scope and pointed it on the high, snow-covered hill where I had last seen the wolves and there stood a black pup, wearing a GPS collar, watching something below. Briefly, its father, also wearing a GPS collar, appeared on the hill before fading away. A van pulled in and visitors rushed out to see if I had found a wolf. "My first wolf in the wild," a woman exclaimed while looking through my scope.............. rest of article


Wolves hunting elk

Wolf eating elk carcass

Weird, wonderful things abound in Yellowstone in winter

When Yellowstone National Park is covered in a blanket of snow, things can get a little weird. With the 2.2-million acre park's geothermal stew of geysers, hot springs, fumaroles and mud pots, dizzying array of wildlife and a vast and diverse landscape, visitors are rewarded with an experience like no place else on Earth. "Throughout the winter season, the park becomes a visual smorgasbord that is both strange and wonderful," said Rick Hoeninghausen, director of sales and marketing for Xanterra Parks & Resorts' Yellowstone National Park Lodges......... rest of article

The park's winter season began Dec. 18 and runs until March 2.

Young 4 Year Old Grizzly Killed By Wyoming Fish And Game......We Want Answers

A young Grizzly bear (#760 - Jim Bear) was killed by wildlife officers that are supposed to protect them from harm. This non aggressive bear was a favorite in the Grand Tetons National Park. He never once showed any signs of aggression and was a good bear. In early October he was "relocated" by Fish and Game because he wandered south of the park and on someone's ranch. By the way, the rancher never complained. Because it was a Grizzly, people freaked out and the bear was taken northwest of Cody, WY near a little town called Clark by Fish and Game. However, this was no place for this bear.....................   read more and sign Petition

grizzly 760 (Jim Bear) six months before he was killed by Wyoming Game and Fish
Jim Bear before Wyoming Game and Fish turned him into a rug.
Grizzly Bear 760

Bear managers' credibility on the line By Tom Mangelson

American poet Robert Frost once expressed a sentiment that many of us feel in our hearts: "The world has room to make a bear feel free."

How I wish it were true today in Wyoming, home to one of the most exceptional bear populations on the planet, including members of the grizzly family so closely identified with our valley.............................  Rest of article

Eighteen below zero, a photographer's delight

By Daryl L. Hunter

Ahh, finally eighteen below zero and beautiful. I have been waiting for a day like this for months. Sadly, too often winter temperatures hover between 20 and 35 degrees, much to warm for the magic of the arctic cold. You draw in that sub-zero air and it's more refreshing than a mouthful of Minto peppermint with a dash of dry ice. Air so crisp it seems it could snap at any moment. The moisture in the air freezes and falls to the ground in sparkly slow motion dance to the ground. This miraculous and dynamic gift from the north facilitates art for those willing to fetch it..........................

rest of story

Yellowstone roadside grizzlies worth rangers' hassle???

Yellowstone visitors would pay an additional $41 to ensure seeing roadside grizzlies, a study shows, and the attraction creates 155 jobs and more than $10 million a year for the regional economy. The $41 visitors would pay is on top of the $25-per-vehicle entrance fee. If Yellowstone no longer allowed grizzly bears to use roadside habitat — and instead chased, moved or killed them — the regional economy would lose more than $10 million a year and 155 jobs according to the paper "The economics of roadside bear viewing."............................Rest of story

New Ebook

The Grand Teton Photo and Field Guide is an encapsulation of the flora, fauna, and photography of Jackson Hole Wyoming and Grand Teton National Park. Also included are thumbnails of the history and geology of the valley. This book is for all visitors with a desire to seek out wildlife, photograph the landscape, or merely learn about the history, geology, and lay of the land of Grand Teton National Park. The author provides general overviews including hot links with more in-depth descriptions of subjects of individual interest.

In the “Lay of the Land” section, includes the obvious highlights along the loop through Grand Teton Park. Hot links to side roads will give you more in-depth description of side roads and feeder roads and their highlights. Also included are descriptions of all two-rut roads that are legal to travel on in Grand Teton Park. GPS links to Google Maps are provided throughout.

As a field guide, profiles of most of animals and birds in the area are described. Jackson Hole is full of wildlife but there are places where animals are, and there are places where they are not. It is a waste of time to scrutinize a landscape devoid of what you are looking for, so this guide narrows options down to the hot spots. I provide maps of the likeliest places to find the popular critters of Grand Teton National Park. I also touch on trees, shrubs, and wildflowers with minimal explanations.  

The grandeur of Grand Teton Park has made it one of the most photographed places in the world. The opportunity to harness multiple juxtapositional elements has drawn photographers for over a century since William Henry Jackson took the first photos here in 1878. Grand Teton Park’s plethora of famous vistas are profiled as well as many which are less clichéd that can bring new perspectives of a well-documented landscape. Grand Tetons’ iconic landscape photo opportunities are described in detail; however, they barely scratch the surface of opportunities as it takes a photographer with an artist’s eye to unveil as they follow their own intuition and vision.  The author who shies away from clichéd landscapes provides a chapter of his favorite places that aren’t landscape clichés.

In the photography section the author includes chapters on composition, exposure basics, when to shoot and why. Daryl has summarized what he teaches in his, half day, Grand Teton workshops in a simple concise way.

If you are only in Grand Teton Park for a day there is a chapter called the “Portfolio Packer Morning Trip,” that does just that, all the icons and several favorite places in a five our blitz.  But it is better to spend more time and dig deep into the embarrassment of riches of Grand Teton National Park................. More Info

Yellowstone National Park: highlights

Locals like to say there's never a bad day in Yellowstone. But some activities are better than others. Near the top of my list is a slow drive along the north shore of Yellowstone Lake. The easy trail to Storm Point is worth a half hour's walk, or more if the wind is calm and the boulders are comfortable for sitting. A few miles east, a side road leads to Lake Butte Overlook which offers views across North America's largest alpine lake to the Teton range 100 miles south. This is a good place to be at sunset........................ rest of story

Yellowstone Volcano Warning?

Yellowstone National Park is fighting viral rumors that the park's bison are fleeing an impending supervolcano eruption. Officials told Reuters that they've been fielding dozens of calls and emails since a video of galloping bison went viral this week in the wake of an earthquake at Yellowstone. They said the video actually shows the animals running down a paved road that leads deeper into the park................. rest of story

Red and Yellow Aspens, Grand Tetons for the Bridger Teton National Forest
Custom Search
Bookmark and Share

This Page

jumping trout