Wind River Valley Attractions

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Boysen State Park
Boysen State Park offers 3 entrances: U.S. Highway 20 (east side), U.S. Highway 26 (south side) and Bass Lake Road (west side). Boysen State Park is one of the larger parks in the State Park System. It is a lake-orientated park at the south end of the Owl Creek Mountains at the mouth of Wind River Canyon now part of the Wind River Canyon Scenic Byway. It offers a variety of water type recreation. Day and camping facilities are available. It features interesting geological formations. Several state record fish have been caught out of the reservoir.
Sinks Canyon
Sinks Canyon
Scott Hunter checks out where the Popo Agie River disapears into the mountain in Sinks Canyon state park in Lander Wyoming

Sinks Canyon is so named because the Middle Fork of the Popo Agie, a rushing mountain river, flows out of the Wind River Mountains and through the Canyon. Halfway down the canyon the river abruptly turns into a large limestone cavern, and the crashing water "sinks" into fissures and cracks at the back of the cave. The river is underground for 1/4 mile until it emerges down canyon in a large calm pool called "The Rise" and then continues its course into the valley below. Where the water goes while it is underground is unknown. The sinks narrow to small, unexplorable log and rock jammed fissures. The Sinks and Rise occur in the thick, easily eroded off-white Madison Limestone formation. The amount of water flowing into the Sinks varies with the season. The average amount of water in the river is 150 cubic feet per second. During spring run-off over 500 cubic feet of water per second roar down the rocky Popo Agie River channel. For many years it was unproven that the water flowing into the Sinks was the same water flowing out at the Rise. Dye tests have proven it is the same water but have revealed other mysteries: it takes the water flowing into the Sinks over two hours to reappear at the Rise. Geologists speculate that while underground the water circulates up and down and through many narrow, winding passages and pools until it resurfaces. It was also discovered that more water flows out at the Rise than goes in at the Sinks. The additional water may be coming from underground springs or other sinks formations in the area. It is unknown exactly how old the Sinks are although they are likely an Ice Age feature thousands of years old. The massive glaciers that carved the canyon exposed the soft limestone and the millions of gallons of water from the melting ice helped erode the underground passages. Native Americans knew of the Sinks for generations. The first white men to see them were fur trappers in the early 1800s.

Wind River Indian Reservation
Shoshone petroglyphs
Shoshone petroglyphs

Wyoming’s Wind River Country is home to the seventh largest Indian reservation in the country. Encompassing more than 2.2 million acres, the Wind River Indian Reservation is home to the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapaho tribes. Visitors to the area can go to powwows and museums to learn more about the local culture, or can recreate on thousands of acres of vast, unspoiled reservation lands (with a special permit)

Fort Washakie is home to the Shoshone Tribal Cultural Center and the cemeteries where both Chief Washakie and Lewis and Clark’s Shoshone guide, Sacajawea, are buried. You will also find a number of trading posts and gift stores that specialize in locally made Indian artwork, including hand-tanned leather goods, beadwork, and drums. Learn more about the Eastern Shoshone people here. Tours, fishing, whitewater adventures etc. are offered by the tribes.

Wind River Hotel & Casino is the premier Wyoming casino, the largest in the state with the biggest collection of Vegas style games. Join us for a great night out with friends for fun, entertainment and good times! Looking for a unique Wyoming vacation? We are your springboard to adventure in the Wind River Country and your Fun Way to Yellowstone.

Yellowstone National Park
Beehive Geyser, Firehole River, Yellowstone
Beehive Geyser, Firehole River, Yellowstone

Established on March 1, 1872, Yellowstone National Park is the first and oldest national park in the world.
Preserved within Yellowstone are Old Faithful Geyser and some 10,000 hot springs and geysers, the majority of the planet's total. These geothermal wonders are evidence of one of the world's largest active volcanoes; its last eruption created a crater or caldera that spans almost half of the park.

An outstanding mountain wildland with clean water and air, Yellowstone is home of the grizzly bear and wolf, and free-ranging herds of bison and elk. It is the core of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, one of the largest intact temperate zone ecosystems remaining on the planet.

The human history of the park dates back 12,000 years. The events of the last 130 years of park history are reflected in the historic structures and sites associated with various periods of park administration and visitor facilities development.

Grand Teton National Park
Jenny Lake in Grand Teton Park
Jenny Lake in Grand Teton Park

Established in 1929, Grand Teton National Park emerged from a complicated and controversial series of events. The park first consisted of the mountain range and several glacial lakes. Later the valley floor was protected as Jackson Hole National Monument. The two areas were combined in 1950.
Today the park encompasses nearly 310,000 acres and protects the Teton Range, Jackson Hole (mountain valley), a 50-mile portion of the Snake River, seven morainal lakes, over 100 backcountry and alpine lakes, and a wide range of wildlife and plant species.
The park is also rich in a cultural history that includes seven eras of human history: early peoples (paleo-indians), Native Americans (modern tribes), fur trappers, homesteaders, ranchers/farmers, conservationists, and recreationalists. Climbing, hiking and backpacking, camping, fishing, wildlife and bird watching, horseback riding, boating on Jackson and Jenny Lakes, rafting on the Snake River, bicycling, and photography are all common activities in the area.
About 4 million visitors enjoy the park each year, most visit between Memorial Day Weekend and Labor Day.

Regional Wildlife
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Nowhere else in the United States, including Alaska, can the casual visitor observe such a striking diversity of "charismatic mega-fauna" (the large mammals) that abound in this region, Bald eagles, golden eagles, black bear, the elusive cougar, the wolverine, the pine marten and the gray wolf. Jackson Hole and Yellowstone are home to that most formidable icon of wildness, the grizzly bear. The region also hosts the largest herds of elk in North America and is one of the few remaining areas in the lower 48 states where the grizzly bear still roams in significant numbers, and is home to the largest free-ranging herd of bison in the lower 48 states.
Shoshone National Forest
Brooks Lake Creek, Shoshone National Forest
Brooks Lake Creek, Shoshone National Forest

Shoshone National Forest is the first federally protected National Forest in the United States and covers nearly 2.5 million acres in the state of Wyoming. Originally a part of the Yellowstone Timberland Reserve, the forest was created by an act of Congress and signed into law by U.S. President Benjamin Harrison in 1891. There are four wilderness areas within the forest, protecting more than half of the managed land area from development. From sagebrush plains through dense spruce and fir forest to craggy mountain peaks, Shoshone National Forest has a rich biodiversity rarely matched in any protected area.

The National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center

The National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center is a 2,775-square-foot Interpretive Center dedicated to public education about the biology and habitat of the Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep with specific focus on the currently largest herd of Rocky Mountain Bighorn sheep in the coterminous United States that winter in the Whisky Basin of Whisky Mountain adjacent to the Fitzpatrick Wilderness in the Shoshone National Forest. The Center preserves and interprets the relationships of the Bighorn sheep and is located in the town of Dubois, Wyoming on U.S. Route 26 along the Wyoming Centennial Scenic Byway. The museum offers interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, and special events. Just outside Dubois stands Whiskey Mountain, home to the largest wintering Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep herd in North America.  Bring your binoculars and make time to visit this unique wildlife habitat area. 

Yellowstone Wildliife Safaris
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The Greater Yellowstone Resource Guide

I have spent thousands of hours researching for, and creating content to create a market for my photography, for 35+ years I have been roaming this land for landscape and adventure photos and content for this effort. although this was the  greatest of adventures exploring every corner of the Greater Yellowstone and sharing it some compensation would be greatly appreciated.

Many photos have link to a shopping cart, custom prints available upon request. Click on logo below to go straight to website.

If you don't need any wall art consider a small donation. Thank you. Fine Art Photography by Daryl L. Hunter

 

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